Tutorial: Text Classification

This tutorial classifies movie reviews as positive or negative using the text of the review. This is an example of binary — or two-class — classification, an important and widely applicable kind of machine learning problem.

We’ll use the IMDB dataset that contains the text of 50,000 movie reviews from the Internet Movie Database. These are split into 25,000 reviews for training and 25,000 reviews for testing. The training and testing sets are balanced, meaning they contain an equal number of positive and negative reviews.

Let’s start and load Keras, as well as a few other required libraries.

Download the IMDB dataset

The IMDB dataset comes packaged with Keras. It has already been preprocessed such that the reviews (sequences of words) have been converted to sequences of integers, where each integer represents a specific word in a dictionary.

The following code downloads the IMDB dataset to your machine (or uses a cached copy if you’ve already downloaded it):

The argument num_words = 10000 keeps the top 10,000 most frequently occurring words in the training data. The rare words are discarded to keep the size of the data manageable.

Conveniently, the dataset comes with an index mapping words to integers, which has to be downloaded separately:

Explore the data

Let’s take a moment to understand the format of the data. The dataset comes preprocessed: each example is an array of integers representing the words of the movie review. Each label is an integer value of either 0 or 1, where 0 is a negative review, and 1 is a positive review.

[1] "Training entries: 25000, labels: 25000"

The texts of the reviews have been converted to integers, where each integer represents a specific word in a dictionary. Here’s what the first review looks like:

  [1]    1   14   22   16   43  530  973 1622 1385   65  458 4468   66 3941    4  173
 [17]   36  256    5   25  100   43  838  112   50  670    2    9   35  480  284    5
 [33]  150    4  172  112  167    2  336  385   39    4  172 4536 1111   17  546   38
 [49]   13  447    4  192   50   16    6  147 2025   19   14   22    4 1920 4613  469
 [65]    4   22   71   87   12   16   43  530   38   76   15   13 1247    4   22   17
 [81]  515   17   12   16  626   18    2    5   62  386   12    8  316    8  106    5
 [97]    4 2223 5244   16  480   66 3785   33    4  130   12   16   38  619    5   25
[113]  124   51   36  135   48   25 1415   33    6   22   12  215   28   77   52    5
[129]   14  407   16   82    2    8    4  107  117 5952   15  256    4    2    7 3766
[145]    5  723   36   71   43  530  476   26  400  317   46    7    4    2 1029   13
[161]  104   88    4  381   15  297   98   32 2071   56   26  141    6  194 7486   18
[177]    4  226   22   21  134  476   26  480    5  144   30 5535   18   51   36   28
[193]  224   92   25  104    4  226   65   16   38 1334   88   12   16  283    5   16
[209] 4472  113  103   32   15   16 5345   19  178   32

Movie reviews may be different lengths. The below code shows the number of words in the first and second reviews. Since inputs to a neural network must be the same length, we’ll need to resolve this later.

[1] 218
[1] 189

Convert the integers back to words

It may be useful to know how to convert integers back to text. We already have the word_index we downloaded above — a list with words as keys and integers as values. If we create a data frame from it, we can conveniently use it in both directions.

Now we can use the decode_review function to display the text for the first review:

[1] "<START> this film was just brilliant casting location scenery story direction
everyone's really suited the part they played and you could just imagine being there
robert <UNK> is an amazing actor and now the same being director <UNK> father came from
the same scottish island as myself so i loved the fact there was a real connection with
this film the witty remarks throughout the film were great it was just brilliant so much
that i bought the film as soon as it was released for <UNK> and would recommend it to
everyone to watch and the fly fishing was amazing really cried at the end it was so sad
and you know what they say if you cry at a film it must have been good and this
definitely was also <UNK> to the two little boy's that played the <UNK> of norman and
paul they were just brilliant children are often left out of the <UNK> list i think
because the stars that play them all grown up are such a big profile for the whole film
but these children are amazing and should be praised for what they have done don't you
think the whole story was so lovely because it was true and was someone's life after all
that was shared with us all"

Prepare the data

The reviews — the arrays of integers — must be converted to tensors before fed into the neural network. This conversion can be done a couple of ways:

  • One-hot-encode the arrays to convert them into vectors of 0s and 1s. For example, the sequence [3, 5] would become a 10,000-dimensional vector that is all zeros except for indices 3 and 5, which are ones. Then, make this the first layer in our network — a dense layer — that can handle floating point vector data. This approach is memory intensive, though, requiring a num_words * num_reviews size matrix.

  • Alternatively, we can pad the arrays so they all have the same length, then create an integer tensor of shape num_examples * max_length. We can use an embedding layer capable of handling this shape as the first layer in our network.

In this tutorial, we will use the second approach.

Since the movie reviews must be the same length, we will use the pad_sequences function to standardize the lengths:

Let’s look at the length of the examples now:

[1] 256
[1] 256

And inspect the (now padded) first review:

  [1]    1   14   22   16   43  530  973 1622 1385   65  458 4468   66 3941    4
 [16]  173   36  256    5   25  100   43  838  112   50  670    2    9   35  480
 [31]  284    5  150    4  172  112  167    2  336  385   39    4  172 4536 1111
 [46]   17  546   38   13  447    4  192   50   16    6  147 2025   19   14   22
 [61]    4 1920 4613  469    4   22   71   87   12   16   43  530   38   76   15
 [76]   13 1247    4   22   17  515   17   12   16  626   18    2    5   62  386
 [91]   12    8  316    8  106    5    4 2223 5244   16  480   66 3785   33    4
[106]  130   12   16   38  619    5   25  124   51   36  135   48   25 1415   33
[121]    6   22   12  215   28   77   52    5   14  407   16   82    2    8    4
[136]  107  117 5952   15  256    4    2    7 3766    5  723   36   71   43  530
[151]  476   26  400  317   46    7    4    2 1029   13  104   88    4  381   15
[166]  297   98   32 2071   56   26  141    6  194 7486   18    4  226   22   21
[181]  134  476   26  480    5  144   30 5535   18   51   36   28  224   92   25
[196]  104    4  226   65   16   38 1334   88   12   16  283    5   16 4472  113
[211]  103   32   15   16 5345   19  178   32    0    0    0    0    0    0    0
[226]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0
[241]    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0
[256]    0

Build the model

The neural network is created by stacking layers — this requires two main architectural decisions:

  • How many layers to use in the model?
  • How many hidden units to use for each layer?

In this example, the input data consists of an array of word-indices. The labels to predict are either 0 or 1. Let’s build a model for this problem:

____________________________________________________________________________________
Layer (type)                         Output Shape                      Param #      
====================================================================================
embedding_1 (Embedding)              (None, None, 16)                  160000       
____________________________________________________________________________________
global_average_pooling1d_1 (GlobalAv (None, 16)                        0            
____________________________________________________________________________________
dense_3 (Dense)                      (None, 16)                        272          
____________________________________________________________________________________
dense_4 (Dense)                      (None, 1)                         17           
====================================================================================
Total params: 160,289
Trainable params: 160,289
Non-trainable params: 0
____________________________________________________________________________________

The layers are stacked sequentially to build the classifier:

  • The first layer is an embedding layer. This layer takes the integer-encoded vocabulary and looks up the embedding vector for each word-index. These vectors are learned as the model trains. The vectors add a dimension to the output array. The resulting dimensions are: (batch, sequence, embedding).
  • Next, a global_average_pooling_1d layer returns a fixed-length output vector for each example by averaging over the sequence dimension. This allows the model to handle input of variable length, in the simplest way possible.
  • This fixed-length output vector is piped through a fully-connected (dense) layer with 16 hidden units.
  • The last layer is densely connected with a single output node. Using the sigmoid activation function, this value is a float between 0 and 1, representing a probability, or confidence level.

Hidden units

The above model has two intermediate or “hidden” layers, between the input and output. The number of outputs (units, nodes, or neurons) is the dimension of the representational space for the layer. In other words, the amount of freedom the network is allowed when learning an internal representation.

If a model has more hidden units (a higher-dimensional representation space), and/or more layers, then the network can learn more complex representations. However, it makes the network more computationally expensive and may lead to learning unwanted patterns — patterns that improve performance on training data but not on the test data. This is called overfitting, and we’ll explore it later.

Loss function and optimizer

A model needs a loss function and an optimizer for training. Since this is a binary classification problem and the model outputs a probability (a single-unit layer with a sigmoid activation), we’ll use the binary_crossentropy loss function.

This isn’t the only choice for a loss function, you could, for instance, choose mean_squared_error. But, generally, binary_crossentropy is better for dealing with probabilities — it measures the “distance” between probability distributions, or in our case, between the ground-truth distribution and the predictions.

Later, when we are exploring regression problems (say, to predict the price of a house), we will see how to use another loss function called mean squared error.

Now, configure the model to use an optimizer and a loss function:

Create a validation set

When training, we want to check the accuracy of the model on data it hasn’t seen before. Create a validation set by setting apart 10,000 examples from the original training data. (Why not use the testing set now? Our goal is to develop and tune our model using only the training data, then use the test data just once to evaluate our accuracy).

Train the model

Train the model for 20 epochs in mini-batches of 512 samples. This is 20 iterations over all samples in the x_train and y_train tensors. While training, monitor the model’s loss and accuracy on the 10,000 samples from the validation set:

Train on 15000 samples, validate on 10000 samples
Epoch 1/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 56us/step - loss: 0.6916 - acc: 0.6060 - val_loss: 0.6895 - val_acc: 0.5805
Epoch 2/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.6851 - acc: 0.7123 - val_loss: 0.6804 - val_acc: 0.7446
Epoch 3/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 32us/step - loss: 0.6713 - acc: 0.7484 - val_loss: 0.6625 - val_acc: 0.7322
Epoch 4/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 33us/step - loss: 0.6454 - acc: 0.7679 - val_loss: 0.6329 - val_acc: 0.7712
Epoch 5/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 42us/step - loss: 0.6068 - acc: 0.7939 - val_loss: 0.5929 - val_acc: 0.7876
Epoch 6/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.5597 - acc: 0.8133 - val_loss: 0.5490 - val_acc: 0.8033
Epoch 7/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.5087 - acc: 0.8345 - val_loss: 0.5020 - val_acc: 0.8210
Epoch 8/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 38us/step - loss: 0.4595 - acc: 0.8512 - val_loss: 0.4601 - val_acc: 0.8369
Epoch 9/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.4154 - acc: 0.8650 - val_loss: 0.4242 - val_acc: 0.8476
Epoch 10/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 38us/step - loss: 0.3780 - acc: 0.8770 - val_loss: 0.3956 - val_acc: 0.8535
Epoch 11/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.3467 - acc: 0.8862 - val_loss: 0.3725 - val_acc: 0.8612
Epoch 12/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.3209 - acc: 0.8931 - val_loss: 0.3542 - val_acc: 0.8673
Epoch 13/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 37us/step - loss: 0.2989 - acc: 0.8989 - val_loss: 0.3414 - val_acc: 0.8662
Epoch 14/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.2800 - acc: 0.9038 - val_loss: 0.3285 - val_acc: 0.8736
Epoch 15/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.2633 - acc: 0.9090 - val_loss: 0.3189 - val_acc: 0.8759
Epoch 16/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 41us/step - loss: 0.2485 - acc: 0.9148 - val_loss: 0.3119 - val_acc: 0.8778
Epoch 17/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 33us/step - loss: 0.2355 - acc: 0.9193 - val_loss: 0.3051 - val_acc: 0.8796
Epoch 18/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.2234 - acc: 0.9233 - val_loss: 0.3004 - val_acc: 0.8801
Epoch 19/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 39us/step - loss: 0.2124 - acc: 0.9266 - val_loss: 0.2965 - val_acc: 0.8812
Epoch 20/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 35us/step - loss: 0.2021 - acc: 0.9300 - val_loss: 0.2931 - val_acc: 0.8823
Epoch 21/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 35us/step - loss: 0.1927 - acc: 0.9347 - val_loss: 0.2904 - val_acc: 0.8830
Epoch 22/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 39us/step - loss: 0.1839 - acc: 0.9395 - val_loss: 0.2886 - val_acc: 0.8840
Epoch 23/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 33us/step - loss: 0.1761 - acc: 0.9426 - val_loss: 0.2873 - val_acc: 0.8841
Epoch 24/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 35us/step - loss: 0.1690 - acc: 0.9459 - val_loss: 0.2866 - val_acc: 0.8850
Epoch 25/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.1606 - acc: 0.9497 - val_loss: 0.2864 - val_acc: 0.8845
Epoch 26/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 35us/step - loss: 0.1540 - acc: 0.9519 - val_loss: 0.2871 - val_acc: 0.8839
Epoch 27/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 38us/step - loss: 0.1475 - acc: 0.9548 - val_loss: 0.2877 - val_acc: 0.8855
Epoch 28/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 39us/step - loss: 0.1412 - acc: 0.9570 - val_loss: 0.2878 - val_acc: 0.8855
Epoch 29/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.1354 - acc: 0.9597 - val_loss: 0.2891 - val_acc: 0.8857
Epoch 30/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 39us/step - loss: 0.1299 - acc: 0.9617 - val_loss: 0.2911 - val_acc: 0.8862
Epoch 31/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 33us/step - loss: 0.1250 - acc: 0.9632 - val_loss: 0.2920 - val_acc: 0.8863
Epoch 32/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.1197 - acc: 0.9653 - val_loss: 0.2939 - val_acc: 0.8868
Epoch 33/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 37us/step - loss: 0.1150 - acc: 0.9679 - val_loss: 0.2960 - val_acc: 0.8854
Epoch 34/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 33us/step - loss: 0.1101 - acc: 0.9697 - val_loss: 0.2989 - val_acc: 0.8847
Epoch 35/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 35us/step - loss: 0.1061 - acc: 0.9702 - val_loss: 0.3026 - val_acc: 0.8857
Epoch 36/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.1021 - acc: 0.9722 - val_loss: 0.3057 - val_acc: 0.8830
Epoch 37/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 0s 32us/step - loss: 0.0978 - acc: 0.9745 - val_loss: 0.3086 - val_acc: 0.8830
Epoch 38/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 37us/step - loss: 0.0939 - acc: 0.9762 - val_loss: 0.3110 - val_acc: 0.8825
Epoch 39/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 36us/step - loss: 0.0897 - acc: 0.9771 - val_loss: 0.3142 - val_acc: 0.8823
Epoch 40/40
15000/15000 [==============================] - 1s 34us/step - loss: 0.0861 - acc: 0.9786 - val_loss: 0.3181 - val_acc: 0.8818

Evaluate the model

And let’s see how the model performs. Two values will be returned. Loss (a number which represents our error, lower values are better), and accuracy.

results <- model %>% evaluate(test_data, test_labels)
results
25000/25000 [==============================] - 0s 15us/step
$loss
[1] 0.34057

$acc
[1] 0.8696

This fairly naive approach achieves an accuracy of about 87%. With more advanced approaches, the model should get closer to 95%.

Create a graph of accuracy and loss over time

fit returns a keras_training_history object whose metrics slot contains loss and metrics values recorded during training. You can conveniently plot the loss and metrics curves like so:

The evolution of loss and metrics can also be seen during training in the RStudio Viewer pane.

Notice the training loss decreases with each epoch and the training accuracy increases with each epoch. This is expected when using gradient descent optimization — it should minimize the desired quantity on every iteration.

This isn’t the case for the validation loss and accuracy — they seem to peak after about twenty epochs. This is an example of overfitting: the model performs better on the training data than it does on data it has never seen before. After this point, the model over-optimizes and learns representations specific to the training data that do not generalize to test data.

For this particular case, we could prevent overfitting by simply stopping the training after twenty or so epochs. Later, you’ll see how to do this automatically with a callback.

More Tutorials

Check out these additional tutorials to learn more:

  • Basic Classification — In this tutorial, we train a neural network model to classify images of clothing, like sneakers and shirts.

  • Basic Regression — This tutorial builds a model to predict the median price of homes in a Boston suburb during the mid-1970s.

  • Overfitting and Underfitting — In this tutorial, we explore two common regularization techniques (weight regularization and dropout) and use them to improve our movie review classification results.

  • Save and Restore Models — This tutorial demonstrates various ways to save and share models (after as well as during training).